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Jill Walker Rettberg, this Monday’s Purple Blurb

Sat, 05/03/2014 - 10:04

Purple Blurb

MIT, room 14E-310

Monday 5/5, 5:30pm

Free and open to the public, no reservation required

Jill Walker Rettberg “Seeing Ourselves Through Technology: How We Use Selfies, Blogs and Wearable Devices to Understand Ourselves”

This Monday (2014-05-05) the Purple Blurb series of Spring 2014 presentations will conclude with a talk by Jill Walker Rettberg on a pervasive but still not well-understood phenomenon, the types of digital writing, tracking, photography, and media production of other sorts that people do about themselves. Her examples will be drawn from her own work as well as from photobooths, older self-portraits, and entries from others’ diaries.

Jill Walker Rettberg is Professor of Digital Culture at the University of Bergen in Norway. Her research centers on how we tell stories online, and she has published on electronic literature, digital art, blogging, games and selfies. She has written a research blog, jilltxt.net, since October 2000, and co-wrote the first academic paper on blogs in 2002. Her book Blogging was published in a second edition in 2014. In 2008 she co-edited an anthology of scholarly articles on World of Warcraft. Jill is currently writing a book on technologically mediated self-representations, from blogs and selfies to automated diaries and visualisations of data from wearable devices.

More about Purple Blurb

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Slice of Trope

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 10:15

Slice of MIT, an MIT alumni publication, has an article on my work with poetry and computation. It’s by Kate Hoagland, was written for National Poetry Month, and is an excellent short discussion of several recent projects and some themes in my work and that of my lab, The Trope Tank.

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Happy 50th to BASIC

Tue, 04/29/2014 - 12:42

Dartmouth is celebrating the 50th anniversary of BASIC tomorrow with several events, including the premiere of a documentary on BASIC that I hope to see soon. I teach two classes tomorrow; those and my other meetings will make it impossible for me to stop by, even though Dartmouth is not very far away.

There’s also a celebratory Time article about BASIC, one that is packed with nice photos, scans, and GIFs showing how programs were listed and how they ran. The GIFs include a sped-up one of 10 PRINT running in an emulator, and there’s a link to 10 PRINT CHR$ (205.5 + RND (1)); : GOTO 10, our book (by Nick Montfort, Patsy Baudoin, John Bell, Ian Bogost, Jeremy Douglass, Mark C. Marino, Michael Mateas, Casey Reas, Mark Sample, and Noah Vawter).

I do genuinely appreciate the link and the article overall – there’s excellent discussion of popular programming, recollections of personally writing BASIC, BASIC in books and magazines, and even David Brin’s 2006 Salon article – but it’s too bad our book is (twice) referred to as “a book of essays” when it is actually a single book-length academic study of the title program; quite in distinction to a book of essays, it was written by the ten of us in a single voice. The book, which among other things provides the major academic study of BASIC this century, is also available for free online and anyone can download/open it in seconds to check it out. And if such a glance entices a reader, he or she may, like the popular BASIC programmer of the late 1970s and 1980s, dive further in and learn about formal, material, cultural, historical, and other aspects of the title program, the Commodore 64, BASIC, and more.

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Gender? I Hardly Know ‘er

Tue, 04/29/2014 - 08:19

The AWP (Association of Writers & Writing Programs) offers you eleven options on their Web form for indicating your gender. But these are listed in a drop-down box, so you can’t choose more than one.

To give a specific example, you can’t choose “male” and “cisgender.”

OPPRESSION!

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Scott Rettberg in Purple Blurb this Monday

Fri, 04/25/2014 - 12:57

Purple Blurb

MIT, room 14E-310

Monday 4/28, 5:30pm

Free and open to the public, no reservation required

Scott Rettberg

This Monday (2014-04-28) Purple Blurb is proud to host a screening and discussion of narrative video art work done in collaboration with Roderick Coover, including The Last Volcano, Cats and Rats, Three Rails Live, and Toxicity. (The last two are combinatory pieces; Three Rails Live is a collaboration between Coover, Rettberg, and Nick Montfort.) These pieces deal with personal and global catastrophes and are written across languages, with one of the voices in Cats and Rats in (subtitled) Norwegian. They continue Rettberg’s work on novel-length electronic literature projects and his frequent collaboration with others.

Scott Rettberg is Professor of Digital Culture in the department of Linguistic, Literary, and Aesthetic studies at the University of Bergen, Norway. Rettberg is the project leader of ELMCIP (Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice), a HERA-funded collaborative research project, and a founder of the Electronic Literature Organization. Rettberg is the author or coauthor of novel-length works of electronic literature, combinatory poetry, and films including The Unknown, Kind of Blue, Implementation, Frequency, Three Rails Live, and Toxicity. His creative work has been exhibited online and at art venues including the Chemical Heritage Foundation Museum, Palazzo dell Arti Napoli, Beall Center, the Slought Foundation, and The Krannert Art Museum.

More about Purple Blurb

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Metadata Games Tag Event: May Day! May Day!

Fri, 04/25/2014 - 08:30

For Immediate Release

Tiltfactor is proud to announce a new collaboration with the British Library! To celebrate, Tiltfactor’s Metadata Games project will launch the new tagging game Ships Tag as part of a tag event called May Day! May Day! starting midnight on May 1st.

The collaboration between the British Library and Tiltfactor presents an innovative way for public users to explore and tag the British Library’ collection of over a million public domain images which were posted onto Flickr Commons in December 2013. By playing Ships Tag, players produce in-game tags which directly contribute to the Library’s content knowledge. This not only helps the British Library augment its metadata, but it also greatly expands the collection’s accessibility for public research, reuse, and repurposing. The entire collection, whose subjects range from intricate maps, geological diagrams, charts, illustrations, landscapes and more, is an amazing opportunity for players to be a part of the process of organizing this vast online collection.

Nora McGregor, Digital Curator at the British Library said “As an institution committed to sparking creativity, the British Library is always looking for ways in which to support the innovative use of our digital collections, particularly through initiatives like the Flickr Commons upload and other associated projects run by the BL Labs team. This project with Metadata Games offers a unique opportunity to both enable better discovery of these wonderful images, while also helping to inform our own processes for enhancing metadata through crowdsourcing in future.”

Ships Tag is the first in a series of three new tagging games, each of which integrates a select subset of images from the British Library’s digital collections. “We are excited for this chance to work with the The British Library,” says Sukie Punjasthitkul, project manager of the Metadata Games project. “Through these three Metadata Games, we look forward to furthering research in player motivation and novel uses of the British Library’s incredible collections.”

About The British Library
The British Library (http://www.bl.uk) is the national library of the United Kingdom and one of the world’s greatest research libraries. It provides world class information services to the academic, business, research and scientific communities and offers unparalleled access to the world’s largest and most comprehensive research collection. The Library’s collection has developed over 250 years and exceeds 150 million separate items representing every age of written civilisation and includes books, journals, manuscripts, maps, stamps, music, patents, photographs, newspapers and sound recordings in all written and spoken languages. Up to 10 million people visit the British Library website – www.bl.uk – every year where they can view up to 4 million digitised collection items and over 40 million pages.

About Metadata Games
Metadata Games (http://www.metadatagames.org) is a free and open source digital gaming platform developed by Tiltfactor Laboratories (http://www.tiltfactor.org) at Dartmouth College, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS). The suite of games enables archivists to gather and analyze information for digital media archives in novel and exciting ways, and provides social science and information science researchers a novel tool with which to investigate crowdsourcing and human computation behaviors and outcomes. Institutions and researchers interested in the project and datasets are encouraged to contact Tiltfactor.

About Tiltfactor
Tiltfactor Laboratory (http://www.tiltfactor.org) is a design studio dedicated to understanding how games can be used to generate new knowledge. Tiltfactor designs, studies, and launches games, across a variety of platforms, that use core psychological principles and strategies to promote learning and impact players’ thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Founded and led by Dr. Mary Flanagan, Tiltfactor uses its unique design methodology, Critical Play, to incorporate fundamental human values and psychological principles to promote pro-social values such as cooperation, perspective taking, empathy, and civic engagement.

###
Metadata Games
Tiltfactor
246 Black Family Visual Arts Center
HB 6194 Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755 USA
+1-603-646-1007
metadata@tiltfactor.org
@tiltfactor
@criticalplay
#metadatagames

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ELO Awards: Call for Nominations

Thu, 04/24/2014 - 15:29

The Electronic Literature Organization is delighted to announce two awards to be given this summer; nominations are open now.

The ELO is proud to announce the ”The N. Katherine Hayles Award for Criticism of
Electronic Literature” and “The Robert Coover Award for a Work of Electronic
Literature.” Below is information including guidelines for submissions for each.

http://eliterature.org/2014/04/announcing-elo-prizes-for-best-literary-and-critical-works/

“The N. Katherine Hayles Award for Criticism of Electronic Literature”

“The N. Katherine Hayles Award for Criticism of Electronic Literature” is an
award given for the best work of criticism, of any length, on the topic of
electronic literature. Bestowed by the Electronic Literature Organization and
funded through a generous donation from N. Katherine Hayles and others, this
$1000 annual prize aims to recognize excellence in the field. The prize comes
with a plaque showing the name of the winner and an acknowledgement of the
achievement, and a one-year membership in the Electronic Literature Organization
at the Associate Level.

We invite critical works of any length. Submissions must follow these
guidelines:

  1. This is an open submission. Self nominations and nominations are both
    welcome. Membership in the Electronic Literature Organization is not required.

  2. There is no cost involved in nominations. This is a free and open award aimed
    at rewarding excellence.

  3. ELO Board Members serving their term of office on the Board are ineligible
    for nomination for the award. Members of the Jury are also not allowed to be
    nominated for the award.

  4. Three finalists for the award will be selected by a jury of specialists in
    electronic literature; N. Katherine Hayles will choose the winner from among the
    finalists.

  5. Because of the nature of online publishing, it is not possible to conduct a
    blind review of the submissions; the jury will be responsible for fair
    assessment of the work.

  6. Those nominated may only have one work considered for the prize. In the event
    that several works are identified for a nominee, the nominee will choose the
    work that he or she wishes to be juried.

  7. All works must have already been published or made available to the public
    within 18 months, no earlier than December 2012.

  8. All print articles must be submitted in .pdf format. Books can be sent either
    in .pdf format or in print format. Online articles should be submitted as a link
    to an online site.

  9. Nominations by self or others must include a 250-word explanation of the
    work’s impact in the field. The winner selected for the prize must also include
    a professional bio and a headshot or avatar.

  10. All digital materials should be emailed to elo.hayles.award@gmail.com by May
    15, 2014; three copies of the book should be mailed to Dr. Dene Grigar, Creative
    Media & Digital Culture, Washington State University Vancouver, 14204 NE Salmon
    Creek Ave., Vancouver, WA 98686 by May 15, 2014. Those making the nomination or
    the nominees themselves are responsible for mailing materials for jurying. Print
    materials will be returned via a self-addressed mailer.

  11. Nominees and the winner retain all rights to their works. If copyright
    allows, ELO will be given permission to share the work or portions of it on the
    award webpage. Journals and presses that have published the winning work will be
    acknowledged on the award webpage.

  12. The winner is not expected to attend the ELO conference banquet. The award
    will be mailed to the winner.

Timeline

Call for Nominations: April 15-May 10

Jury Deliberations: May 15-June 10

Award Announcement: ELO Conference Banquet

For more information, contact Dr. Dene Grigar, President, Electronic Literature
Organization: “dgrigar” at mac.com.

“The Robert Coover Award for a Work of Electronic Literature”

“The Robert Coover Award for a Work of Electronic Literature” is an award given
for the best work of electronic literature of any length or genre. Bestowed by
the Electronic Literature Organization and funded through a generous donation
from supporters and members of the ELO, this $1000 annual prize aims to
recognize creative excellence. The prize comes with a plaque showing the name of
the winner and an acknowledgement of the achievement, and a one-year membership
in the Electronic Literature Organization at the Associate Level.

We invite critical works of any length and genre. Submissions must follow these
guidelines:

  1. This is an open submission. Self nominations and nominations are both
    welcome. Membership in the Electronic Literature Organization is not required.

  2. There is no cost involved in nominations. This is a free and open award aimed
    at rewarding excellence.

  3. ELO Board Members serving their term of office on the Board are ineligible
    for nomination for the award. Members of the Jury are also not allowed to be
    nominated for the award.

  4. Three finalists for the award will be selected by a jury of specialists in
    electronic literature; Robert Coover or a representative of his will choose the
    winner from among the finalists.

  5. Because of the nature of online publishing, it is not possible to conduct a
    blind review of the submissions; the jury will be responsible for fair
    assessment of the work.

  6. Those nominated may only have one work considered for the prize. In the event
    that several works are identified for a nominee, the nominee will choose the
    work that he or she wishes to be juried.

  7. All works must have already been published or made available to the public
    within 18 months, no earlier than December 2012.

  8. Works should be submitted either as a link to an online site or in the case
    of non-web work, available via Dropbox or sent as a CD/DVD or flash drive.

  9. Nominations by self or others must include a 250-word explanation of the
    work’s impact in the field. The winner selected for the prize must also include
    a professional bio and a headshot or avatar.

  10. Links to the digital materials or to Dropbox should be emailed to
    elo.coover.award@gmail.com by May 15, 2014; three copies of the CD/DVDs and
    flash drives should be mailed to Dr. Dene Grigar, Creative Media & Digital
    Culture, Washington State University Vancouver, 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave.,
    Vancouver, WA 98686 by May 15, 2014. Those making the nomination or the nominees
    themselves are responsible for mailing materials for jurying. Physical materials
    will be returned via a self-addressed mailer.

  11. Nominees and the winner retain all rights to their works. If copyright
    allows, ELO will be given permission to share the work or portions of it on the
    award webpage. Journals and presses that have published the winning work will be
    acknowledged on the award webpage.

  12. The winner is not expected to attend the ELO conference banquet. The award
    will be mailed to the winner.

Timeline

Call for Nominations: April 19-May 10

Jury Deliberations: May 15-June 10

Award Announcement: ELO Conference Banquet

For more information, contact Dr. Dene Grigar, President, Electronic Literature
Organization: “dgrigar” at mac.com.

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Bitcoin for your Warhol!

Thu, 04/24/2014 - 08:59

Thanks to Golan Levin’s “atypical, anti-disciplinary and inter-institutional” FRSCI lab, the CMU Computer Club, and ROM hacking bit-boy Cory Archangel, several instances of previously unknown visual artwork, done by Andy Warhol on the Amiga 1000 in 1985, have been recovered.

Warhol’s use of this classic multimedia system is but one of the many surprising, rich aspects of Amiga history that are carefully detailed by Jimmy Maher in The Future Was Here: The Commodore Amiga. An early topic is the launch of the first Amiga computer at the Lincoln Center, with Andy Warhol and Debbie Harry in attendance and with Warhol producing a portrait of her on the machine during the festivities. Maher also writes about how Warhol’s attitude toward the computer was actually a bit retrograde in some ways: Rather than thinking of the screen as a first-class medium for visual art, he wanted better printers that could produce work in a more conventional medium. The discussion of Warhol’s involvement is but one chapter (actually, less than one chapter) in a book that covers the Amiga’s hardware development, technical advances, relationship to image editing and video processing work, and lively demos — from the early, famous “Boing Ball” demo to the productions of the demoscene. The Future Was Here is the latest book in the Platform Studies series, which I edit with Ian Bogost.

With these images surfacing now, after almost 30 years, the age-old question “soup or art?” is awakened in us once again. Do we need to print these out to enjoy them? To sell them for cash? Did Warhol invent what is now thought of as the “MS Paint” style, back on the Amiga 1000 in 1985?

Note, finally, that there is a detailed report on the recovery project provided in PDF form.

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A Superreboot

Tue, 04/22/2014 - 17:52

There’s a remake (or maybe a reboot?) of superbad.com, the classic, off-kilter, uncanny art website that was employed back in 2008 in a Grand Text Auto April Fool’s joke.

It’s www.orworse.net.

I guess they made it worse by adding a “www.”

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Psychological Theories

Tue, 04/22/2014 - 07:19

Tiltfactor works to create games that promote fun and social change in equal measure. The Tilt team employs leading psychological theories and game research to produce powerful gaming experiences, which we hope will further the research upon which our products are based. Below, we’ve shared some of the literature that forms our approach.


Theories and Research:


I. Transformative Potential of Fictional Narratives

A. Exploring Potential Relationships between Individuals and Characters

1. Characters as Friends:
Horton, D., & Wohl, R. R. (1956). Mass communication and para-social interaction: Observations on intimacy at a distance. Psychiatry, 19(3), 215-229.
–Classic work that established the phenomenon of “parasocial interaction” – the illusion of intimacy experienced toward fictional characters, celebrities, and media figures

2. Characters as Role Models:
Hoffner, C. (1996). Children’s wishful identification and parasocial interaction with favorite television characters. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 40, 389-402.
–Examined the relationship between children’s favorite characters and the personality traits possessed by the character that the children wished to emulate

3. Characters as Personas to Assume
Kaufman, G.F., & Libby, L.K. (2012). Changing beliefs and behavior through experience-taking. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 103, 1-19.
–Introduced the concept of experience-taking: the psychological process of simulating the subjective experience of a character and adopting the mindset and identity of that character; revealed numerous implications for behavior change (e.g., voting) and attitude change (e.g., reducing stereotypes and prejudice)

Gabriel, S., & Young, A. F. (2011). Becoming a vampire without being bitten: The narrative collective-assimilation hypothesis. Psychological science, 22, 990-994.
–Showed that readers form an implicit (i.e., unconscious) link between themselves and the group to which a liked character belongs (e.g., vampires in Twilight)

B. Persuasive Impact of Fictional Narratives
Dal Cin, S., Zanna, M. & Fong, G. (2004). Narrative persuasion and overcoming resistance. In E. Knowles & J. Linn (Eds.), Resistance and Persuasion. (pp 175-191). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
–Comprehensive review of empirical studies that investigated the factors affecting the persuasive impact of narratives

Green, M. C., & Brock, T. C. (2000). The role of transportation in the persuasiveness of public narratives. Journal of personality and social psychology, 79, 701-721.
–Explored the impact of transportation (i.e., psychological absorption) in a narrative world on readers’ adoption of beliefs expressed by characters

II. The Impact of Embodied Cognition on Perceptions, Judgments, and Behaviors

Embodied cognition is a topic of research in psychology and philosophy that argues that perceptual and visceral experiences can constrain and direct cognition and judgment (and vice versa), often outside of conscious awareness. Such effects can be attributed to the fact that there is a common “mental storage system” for physical or sensory experiences and the metaphors or abstract concepts related to them.

Lakoff, G., & Johnson, M. (1980). Metaphors we live by (Vol. 111). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
–Foundational work establishing the role of metaphor in shaping psychological and visceral experience

Semin, G. R., & Smith, E. R. (2002). Interfaces of social psychology with situated and embodied cognition. Cognitive Systems Research, 3(3), 385-396.
–Lays out the intersection between embodied cognition and psychological change

Carney, D. R., Cuddy, A. J., & Yap, A. J. (2010). Power posing brief nonverbal displays affect neuroendocrine levels and risk tolerance. Psychological Science, 21(10), 1363-1368.
–Showed that holding “power poses” (i.e., expansive, open postures) for just one minute increased testosterone levels, lowered cortisol levels, and increased feelings of power

III. Interventions to Reduce Stereotypes and Prejudice

Hill, C., Corbett, C. & St. Rose, A. (2010). Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. Washington, DC: AAUW.
–Thorough review of the psychological literature covering two key psychological barriers to women’s participation in STEM domains – stereotype threat and implicit bias – and interventions shown to reduce them

Devine, P. G. (1989). Stereotypes and prejudice: Their automatic and controlled components. Journal of personality and social psychology, 56, 5-18.
–Foundational work arguing that to break the “mental habit” of bias requires: (1) awareness of bias and the contexts in which it occurs, (2) concern about the effects of bias, and (3) application of interventions (see examples below) to “unlearn” stereotypical associations
A. Intervention: Perspective-taking
Galinsky, A. D., & Moskowitz, B. (2000). Perspective-taking: Decreasing stereotype expression, stereotype accessibility, and in-group favoritism. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78, 708-724.
–Revealed that imagining a “day in the life” of a member of another group (e.g., the elderly) promoted positive views toward that group

B. Intervention: Exposure to Counter-stereotypical Exemplars
Blair, I. V., Ma, J. E., & Lenton, A. P. (2001). Imagining stereotypes away: The moderation of implicit stereotypes through mental imagery. Journal of personality and social psychology, 81, 828-841.
–Showed that imagining members of groups who defy stereotypes (e.g., “strong women”) effectively reduced unconscious biases toward those groups

C. Intervention: Increasing Individuals’ Social Identity Complexity
Roccas, S., & Brewer, M. B. (2002). Social identity complexity. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 6, 88-106.
–Established the construct of social identity complexity – the level of diversity and inclusiveness in individuals’ representation of their social groups – and argued for its link to tolerance

D. Intervention: Encouraging a “Universal Orientation”
Phillips, S. T., & Ziller, R. C. (1997). Toward a theory and measure of the nature of nonprejudice. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 72, 420-434.
–Introduced the concept of “universal orientation” – an indication of non-prejudice whereby individuals reject social categories as a basis for interpersonal assumptions

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Console Yourself In Flight

Mon, 04/14/2014 - 12:43

If you, like Ian Bogost, manage to attain Titanium Medallion status on Delta, you too can influence the content of the company’s safety videos.

Categories: Gaming Feeds

Transcendance

Fri, 04/11/2014 - 11:18

The premiere of the film Transcendance, directed by Wally Pfister and starring Johnny Depp as AI researcher Dr. Will Caster, was last night in Westwood. I got to go since my spouse produced and co-wrote the iOS and Android game that accompanies this movie. Johnny Depp and other cast members were there, but, alas, I did not get to hang with them; there were many interesting conversations nevertheless and I was glad to get to see the film for the first time. (Those involved with it had often seen very many cuts already, of course.) The general theatrical release of the film is April 18.

It’s an idea-packed film with a good bit of action, explosions, and so on, as well as innumerable nanites. Much can and will be said of it. One thing I was pleasantly surprised to note, though, was that the film expressed a bit how AI researchers (and by extension academic researchers more generally) have different motivations for what they do. Some are mainly interested in the challenges that problems present, because those problems are beautiful or inherently interesting. Some want to learn and understand things about the world. Some want to produce benefits in the world. And (although this group is not represented among the top researchers in the world) for some it’s just a job to make a living. It was nice to see the nuance of these different motivations in the way AI research was portrayed in Transcendance.

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Microcodes and more Non-Object Art

Wed, 04/09/2014 - 04:40

In NOO ART, The Journal of Objectless Art, there’s a conversation between Páll Thayer and Daniel Temkin that was just posted. (Thayer recently collaborated with me to put up “Programs at an Exhibition,” the first software art show at the Boston Cyberarts Gallery.) The conversation covers Thayer’s code art, including his Perl Microcodes and antecedents, but also touches on free software, Windows, various esoteric languages by Temkin and others, painting and drawing, Christiane Paul’s CodeDOC project at the Whitney, “expert cultures,” and the future of code-based art.

It’s great reading, and objectless art might be just the thing to go with your object-oriented ontology.

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Those Persistent Mainframes

Mon, 04/07/2014 - 08:11

Mickey Rooney is no longer with us, but the mainframe computer is. The Register writes up the 50th anniversary of IBM’s System 360, finishing by describing the current zEnterprise line of IBM mainframes. The line was updated just last year.

If this anniversary encourages you to hit the books about the System 360, I suggest IBM’s 360 and Early 370 Systems by Emerson W. Pugh, Lyle R. Johnson and John H. Palmer.

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Lance Olsen in Purple Blurb, Mon 5:30pm

Sun, 04/06/2014 - 08:36

“Lance Olsen is at the center of every discussion I have about the contemporary landscape of innovative and experimental writing.”

-Bookslut

Lance Olsen

April 7, 5:30pm

MIT’s Room 14E-310

Experimental writing & video

Including a reading from his recent book [[ there. ]] and video from his Theories of Forgetting project.

Lance Olsen is author of more than 20 books of and about innovative writing, including two appearing this spring: the novel based on Robert Smithson’s earthwork the Spiral Jetty, Theories of Forgetting (accompanied by a short experimental film made by one of its characters), and [[ there. ]], a trash-diary meditation on the confluence of travel, curiosity, and experimental writing practices. His short stories, essays, and reviews have appeared in hundreds of journals and anthologies. A Guggenheim, Berlin Prize, N.E.A. Fellowship, and Pushcart Prize recipient, as well as a Fulbright Scholar, he teaches experimental theory and practice at the University of Utah.

Read the Bookslut interview about Lance Olsen’s [[ there. ]].

">More on the Purple Blurb series.

Purple Blurb takes place on MIT’s main campus in Building 14, the same building that is the home of the Hayden Library. 14E-310 in in the East Wing, third floor, across the courtyard from the library entrance (do not enter the library to get to 14E-310).

Purple Blurb is free and open to the public, no reservation required.

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